Atta rainforest lodge, Guyana

Get up into the trees like monkeys at Atta Lodge, for some up close and personal wildlife viewing.

The major attraction here is a 154m/505ft long canopy walkway, with four platforms some up to 30m into the canopy.

An array of birds and animals you struggle to see from the forest floor soon zoom into view.

Among these are endangered and protected species such as the jaguar, the bullet wood tree, greenheart and the waramadan (endemic in Guyana only to the Iwokrama Forest).

The lodge provides comfortable accommodation with 8 private rooms, three home-cooked meals per day, and ample opportunities to explore the surrounding rainforest by foot, canoe, or 4X4.


Caiman House, Guyana

You’ll need to keep quiet in your kayak as you help researchers from Caiman House search and tag black caiman at night time.

By staying here, you’ll get an inside look at the work of those trying to protect this endangered species.

You can help to collect the data of any captured caiman – some reaching up to 12 feet in length! – before they are released back into the wild.

Caiman House is once-in-a-lifetime and thrilling part to any tour of Guyana, especially for wildlife enthusiasts who can also look out for snakes, frogs, bird spiders and more

 


Georgetown, Guyana

Horses on the street in Georgetown Guyana

The Atlantic gateway to Guyana, Georgetown is a fascinating mix of people, history fusions.

The ex-British colony contains influences from Amerindians, Asia, Brazil and more, making it a lively and welcoming destination.

The Natural History Museum is well worth a visit, as well as the world’s largest wooden cathedral and the thrumming market.

English is widely spoken and friendly local people are normally up for a chat about the unique atmosphere of Georgetown.


Iwokrama Field Station , Guyana

Deep into Guyana’s enormous rainforest lies Iwokrama, a one million acre wilderness full of wildlife.

Birds, trees frogs and the elusive puma live in the forests, whose verdant canopy you can enjoy from the Turtle Mountain vantage point.

The area is protected and known as Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation, with the full involvement of the local people.

You can see their history in the Amerindian petroglyphs close to some rivers, a fascinating insight into how animals and humans have coexisted for centuries in this pristine rainforest.


Kaieteur Falls, Guyana

Watching Kaieteur Falls Guyana

Flying over the jungle canopy, the views confirm that there are no other falls in the world with the magnitude of the sheer drop existing at Kaieteur.

Being so remote, you can walk right up to the flowing water, which gushes 822 feet into a deep and forested gorge.

Look for Golden frogs, unique to a tiny area, living in bromeliads growing in the warm, humid air.

Most likely your group will be the only souls in this remote location, adding to its incredible appeal.


Roraima Mountains, Guyana

Rumoured to have inspired parts of Conan Doyle’s Lost World book, ‘Tepuys’, or table top mountains, after visiting, it’s easy to see why.

From the sabanna that links Guyana’s western front with Venuzuela, the Tepuys rise dramatically.

They provide unique eco-zones for many species and the lunar-like surface is home to species found nowhere else on earth.

Waterfalls, rapids and rainforest criss-cross the various faces and sections of the Tepuys, making Mount Roraima one of the most acclaimed sights in South America.


Karanambu Ranch, Guyana

Famous for rescuing orphaned giant river otters, Karanambu also represents the spirit of travel of old.

An outpost, miles from civilisation, there’s a warm welcome and great wildlife.

See the giant Victoria Regis water lily bloom at dusk, or cruise the river looking for giant otters and caiman.

If you wake early enough, you may be able to find a giant anteater snaffling around for a treat.

Sadly, Diane McTurk is no longer with us, but the ranch continues to write its own chapters in the history of conservation.


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