Kicker Rock, Galapagos

Pelican and Kicker rock Galapagos

A truly impressive sight, Kicker Rock is the remains of an underwater volcano rising vertically 150m/492ft out of the sea.

The exposed cone has fractured in two, leaving a wildlife rich sea channel for us to enjoy, snorkelling or diving.

Jump in the water and drift with the gentle current through the cleft, keeping an eye out below for sea turtles, manta rays and maybe the odd harmless Galapagos shark, just to name a few.

Hammerheads are occasionally seen here too.

On the cliffs, we can spot Blue-footed Boobies, Nazca Boobies and magnificent Frigate birds. A memorable snorkel.


Santa Cruz, Galapagos

Finch Bay snorkelling with Turtle Galapagos

Almost everyone will visit Santa Cruz during a Galapagos stay.

It’s popular because of the incredible variety of habitat and animals go alongside its strategic location.

The famous Charles Darwin Centre is a must, as is a visit to see Giant Tortoises and a kayak in the turquoise waters at Garrapatero beach.

There are a plethora of great dive and snorkel sites nearby, lively bars and some good beaches for relaxing, like Tortuga Bay.

Most cruises start or end here, and the majority of flights come to Santa Cruz, plus there are many accommodation options, from basic to luxury.


Santiago (James), Galapagos

Iguana and land arch Santiago Galapagos

Curious, dark sand greets the visitor to this centrally-located island.

Marine iguanas may join you for a snorkel after warming up in the sun, along with white-tipped reef sharks, rays, surgeon and parrotfish and turtles.

Crabs, sea lions and spectacular blowholes line the shore.

On the other side of the island, red sand cliffs are home to many seabirds, and Bucaneer cove tells its own whaling and pirate history.

A group of nearby small rocky islands called Bainbridge Rocks feature a stunning, turquoise saltwater lagoon that is home to flamingos.


The Galapagos Islands

Pinnacle rock from Bartolome Galapagos Ecuador

The Galapagos is an ideal year-round destination, with its volcanic landscapes and tame wildlife.

Whether you cruise or stay in a hotel, you are guaranteed to see giant tortoises, sea lions, iguanas and blue-footed boobies to name a few, plus amazing volcanic formations and stunning beaches.

No trip here is complete without diving or snorkelling – turtles, rays, schools of fish, and for the lucky, hammerhead and whale sharks.

Divers can enjoy some of the best underwater diving in the world on liveaboard cruises to remote and spectacular dive sites.


Tower (Genovesa), Galapagos

Red feet of a red footed Booby Genovesa Galapagos

Flung way out to the north of the archipelago, this spectacular island is a Galapagos in miniature.

Its remote location meaning very few people make it this far.

Sea lions, sharks and Flightless Cormorants will no doubt accompany you on snorkels in deep waters as well as close to the beautiful, white-sand bay.

A multitude of birds nest at Tower, and it’s the only place you’re sure to see the Red-Footed Booby, as well as the chance to spot petrels, owls, gulls and more.


Isabela, Galapagos

Cave Punta Vicente Roca Isabela Galapagos

Isabela is the largest and one of the youngest Galapagos islands, and its small human but enormous wildlife population make it perfect for cruises and hotel-based visits.

It also has a mile-long, pristine white-sand beach, with some small and cool bars to hang out in with some sundowners.

Must-do’s include Sierra Negra volcano and its active caldera, head to Los Tuneles to snorkel face-to-face with sharks and turtles and spend some time looking for penguins at Las Tintoreras.

Isabela is great for adventure and families alike.

For cruises only, Punta Vicente Roca is a lovely snorkel, and Urbina Bay is a top spot for wild giant tortoises and colourful land iguanas.


Floreana, Galapagos

Post Office Bay Floreana Galapagos

Floreana is the least populated Galapagos island and yet home to its most scandalous tales!

Gossip aside, it is home to Post Office Bay, where a post barrel was erected in the late 18th century by English whalers. Passing sailors took the messages onwards – and it still functions today.

The nearby Devil’s Crown is one of Galapagos’ most special snorkels.

A (at times strong) current pushes you past the remains of a submerged volcano with its crater ‘horns’ still exposed, and you’ll see a brilliant array of colourful fish and corals.

Great viewpoints at Asilo de La Paz and Baroness view, too.


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