Posada Amazonas Eco-lodge

Detailed Itinerary

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Introduction

The Posada Amazon Eco-lodge is the perfect introduction to Peru’s rainforests’ rich diversity of wildlife and cultures.

Posada is easy to get to and the canopy is brimming with animals, making it an ideal Peru amazon rainforest trip for everyone.

Your native guide will bring the forest plants to life while all the while helping you spot monkeys, macaws – and perhaps a jaguar!

When not exploring, relax in your comfy cabin and hammock and enjoy lovely Amazonian dining with fellow Amazon adventurers.

 

Amazon eco lodge in Peru

Thanks to its accessibility, excellent wildlife, cultural impact and comfortable accommodation, Posada is ideal for your Amazon rainforest trip.

The Posada eco-lodge is built within a 2,000 hectare, private, communal reserve, which is directly adjacent to the Tambopata National Reserve.

There are opportunities to see macaws and parrots on the nearby clay lick, river otters ad monkeys, as well as a better understanding of the rainforest’s plants and history.

Evenings can be spent in the rainforest or watching the sun go down from the canopy tower, giving you the perfect sunset over the rainforest.

Your expert guides tailor your trip to suit your needs and the weather to make the most of your time in the Amazon.

 

Trip Highlights

  • Perfect eco-lodge for a first taste of the Amazon rainforest – easy to reach, lovely rooms and lots of wildlife.
  • Paddle around a lake looking for the resident otters and black caiman.
  • Community-owned and run by the indigenous Ese-Eja community of Infierno, and located within the Ese-Eja’s communal reserve, next to the Tambopata National Reserve.
  • 30-metre Canopy Tower affords spectacular views over the forest and chance to spot macaws, toucans and parrots.
  • Expert native guides help you spot monkeys, macaws and – with luck – jaguars!
  • Tour with a shaman who will explain the medicinal uses of the rainforest’s plants.

Posada Amazonas Itinerary

Day 1: Fly to Maldonaldo, transfer to lodge, canopy tower (L,D)

Upon arrival from Lima or Cusco (we can look for these flights), we welcome you at the airport and drive ten minutes to the Puerto Maldonado headquarters.

Note: You must arrive in Maldonaldo before 13.00.

While enjoying your first taste of the forest in our gardens we ask you to pack only the necessary gear for your next few days, and leave the rest in our safe deposit in Maldonaldo. This helps us keep the boats and cargo light.

Skirting Puerto Maldonado, we drive 20 kilometres to the Tambopata River Port, entering the Native Community of Infierno. Boxed Lunch.

The forty five minute boat ride from the Tambopata Port to Posada Amazonas takes us into the Community’s Primary Forest Private Reserve, and you can enjoy a boxed lunch en route.

Upon arrival, the lodge manager welcomes you and briefs you with important navigation and security tips for the lodge and rainforest as you settle into your rooms.

We then head to the canopy tower.

Canopy tower: A twenty minute walk from the lodge leads to the 30-metre scaffolding canopy tower. A staircase, with banisters, provides safe access to the platforms above. From atop you obtain spectacular views of the vast expanses of standing forest cut by the Tambopata River winding through the middle. Now and then toucans, parrots or macaws are seen flying against the horizon, or mixed species canopy flocks land in the treetop next to you.

We return to the lodge for dinner after which there is a presentation on the Infierno ecotourism project, available every night from a staff member.

Day 2: Oxbow Lake, botanical hike (B,L,D)

After breakfast, we head to the Tres Chimbadas Oxbow Lake. It takes thirty minutes by boat and forty five minutes to hike there from the lodge.

Once there, you paddle around the lake in a catamaran, searching for the resident family of nine giant river otters (seen by 60% of our lake visitors) and other lakeside wildlife such as caiman, hoatzin and horned screamers.

Following a boxed lunch, we take a botanical tour, to learn all about the uses for the rainforest’s plants. A twenty minute boat drive downriver leads you to a trail designed by the staff of the Centro Ñape. The Centro Ñape is a communal organization that produces medicines out of forest plants and administers them to patients who visit their small clinic. They have produced a trail, which you can follow, which explains the different medicinal (and other) uses of selected plants.

We return to the lodge for a sumptuous dinner.

Afterwards, there is an option for a hike in the rainforest at night, a great experience. It’s when most of the mammals are active but rarely seen. It’s much easier to find the frogs with shapes and sounds as bizarre as their natural histories.

Day 3: Clay lick, Ceiba Trail Hike (B,L,D)

We are up early, before breakfast, to visit the clay lick. The clay lick is only a twenty-minute walk from the lodge.

From a blind located about twenty metres away, we hope to see dozens of parrots and parakeets descend on most clear mornings to eat the clay from the river bank.

Species such as Mealy and Yellow- headed Amazon, Blue-headed Parrot and Dusky headed Parakeet descend at this clay lick. The clay lick is active at dawn, during the late mornings and mid-afternoons.

We head back to the lodge for breakfast.

Mid-morning we head off on a new trail, the Ceiba Trail Hike. It’s two hours, and as well as keeping an eye out for wildlife, the highlight is the largest tree in the vicinity: a giant ceiba tree. Your guide will also tell about the natural history of the rain forest en route, and then we return to the lodge for lunch.

In the afternoon, we hop back into the boats for half an hour to visit the most complete farm in the community of Infierno. The owner grows a diverse variety of popular and little known Amazon crops. In his garden, just about every plant and tree serves a purpose.

We return for our last night at the lodge (you can stay for 3, 4, 5 or more days) for our final dinner, with options night hikes and talks available.

Note: The described itinerary many vary according to the weather, season, flight times or personal choice.

Day 4: Return to Cusco/Lima (B)

Rise before dawn for an early breakfast and depart  to journey downriver connecting by car and boat again in order to catch the flight from Puerto Maldonado to Lima or Cusco.

Note: Earliest flight departure time is 10.45am.


What's Included?

Eco-lodge accommodation in standard room (upgrades available), land and river transport, all transfers, English-speaking guide, meals as listed, treated water, tea and coffee, Wi-Fi.

What's Not Included?

Flights (please ask for prices), visa fees, excess baggage, additional nights during the trip due to flight cancellations, alcoholic drinks or bottled water, snacks, insurance, laundry, tips, phone calls and items of personal nature.


Accommodation

All rooms have an authentic Ese-Eja décor which has been crafted by artists from the local community of Infierno.

All rooms feature private bathrooms with access to hot water showers.

The rooms also feature an open verandha so you can feel part of the rainforest. Don’t fret! The few (if any) animals that may come in can be swiftly removed by the locals.

There are three room types:

 

Classic Rooms

Quaint, comfortable rooms in the middle of the tropical rainforest allow guests to experience this global biodiversity hotspot even during their down time.

Monkeys, many species of birds, frogs, and other rainforest wildlife are often visible from our signature windowless verandahs. Those same verandahs also add comfort with excellent ventilation. Classic rooms are built with local materials such as tropical hardwoods, palms, bamboo, and adobe.

They are available as doubles or triples and come equipped with mosquito nets for the beds and have spacious private bathrooms with hot water. Numerous kerosene lamps and candles provide soft lighting. Electricity and internet are just a short walk to the common areas of the lodge.

Experience the Peruvian jungle in one of our classic rooms and enjoy:

  • Quaint, classic, comfortable Amazon rainforest rooms.
  • Watching birds and looking for other rainforest wildlife from an open verandah that looks straight into the Amazon jungle.
  • All rooms are built with local materials for an authentic experience.
  • Each bed has a mosquito net.
  • Hot water bathrooms in the heart of the jungle!
  • Soft, romantic lighting from candles and kerosene lamps.
  • An authentic jungle retreat to rest up before and after guided trips to the canopy tower, guided hikes in the jungle, watching Giant Otters and other wildlife at an oxbow lake, and other exciting jungle activities.

 

Superior Rooms

The superior rooms have lovely, varnished tropical hardwood floors, are 45 square metres, and have an open verandah that looks out into a roadless, wild tropical rainforest preserve.

Superior rooms are available as singles, doubles or twins, and each is equipped with a mosquito net over large, comfortable beds, two hypoallergenic pillows per person, a hammock, and a reading table.

Stay in one of our superior rooms and enjoy:

  • A large, spacious, 45 meter square room.A big spacious bathroom with plenty of hot water.
  • Electricity in the middle of the Amazon rainforest until 10 PM every night.
  • An outlet to charge your laptop, tablet, and other devices.
  • Free online access from the comfort and privacy of your room to communicate with the outside world, and share the images and excitement of your Amazon adventure.
  • Personal safe deposit box. An umbrella (this is the rainforest after all).
  • Several eco-friendly amenities.
  • A place to relax after exciting jungle hikes, watching macaws fly past at the canopy tower, visiting a tranquil oxbow lake, experiencing Ese Eja culture, and enjoying other exciting Amazon rainforest activities.

 

Suite Rooms

These are the same as the superiors with these additions:

  • King-sized bed
  • Private deck
  • Ceiling fan
  • Mini bar

Tour Staff

Local native guides come from the community and/or the area surrounding the lodge. Some specialist guides do come from other parts of Peru.

They speak English and will bring the rainforest alive for you. Each has a speciality/interest as well as a broad overview of the forest.

The lodge itself is staffed by community members, so you visit really means giving back to the locals.


Meals

The lodge’s dedicated kitchen staff serve up a mix of local dishes and international plates using food from the rainforest wherever possible.

This means a delight for the tastebuds as there are so many tasty treats growing around the lodge.

Breakfasts are usually early and there are fruit juices made from local plants – some of which you may have never heard of – along with teas and locally-grown coffee. There are usually cakes, jams and a choice of eggs, toasts and cereals.

Lunch and dinner are usually three courses – a soup to start followed by a hearty main and then pudding.

Fish, chicken and beef all feature, and there is always a vegetarian option, too (almost all dietary requirements can be catered for). Side dishes include yams and potatoes and rice, plus more rainforest delicacies.

Pudding is often fruit or a cake made in the local style.

Activity Level

These trips are designed to be open to people of all ages and abilities.

You need to be able to step into and out of a boat and the fitter you are the more you will enjoy the trip.

Walks are short in length but you may be on your feet for 2-3 hours as you stop to look at wildlife. There are shorter walks for those who don’t want to walk so far – your guide will talk to you about preferred activity levels.

There are also rides in boats/canoes that can last up to 1.5 hours, depending on the tour.

Massages and reflexology are available, at extra cost.



Practical Information

Introduction to Peru

Peru is the perfect holiday destination for adventure travellers that want an amazing variety of activity, geography and cultural travel experiences.

The breadth of travel experiences in Peru is breathtaking – from trekking in the Andes to Machu Picchu to the tropical jungle of the Amazon, and plenty in between.

The people of Peru make it a special destination too, with its colourful and traditional street life and friendly locals.

Geography of Peru

Peru is made up of 3 distinct geographical areas: the coast, the mountains and the jungle.

The costa or coastal region is a narrow ribbon of desert 2,250 km long, crossed by fertile river valleys flowing from the Andes. It takes up 11% of the country and holds more than 40% of the population.

The cold Humboldt current gives rise to a blanket of mist – the garua – which hangs above coastal cities like the capital Lima from May to November.

Heading east, you’re soon climbing above the garua and into the Andes. The sierra, or mountainous region, covers some 25% of Peru’s territory and contains 50% of the population. The sierra inhabitants are mainly Indigenous or Mestizo, and many still speak Quechua or Aymara.

The sierra contains dozens of 6,000-metre snow peaks and volcanoes, including Huascaran (6,768m) the highest mountain in the tropics. The deep valley basins contain most of the towns and arable land; the terracing and canal systems of the Incas and pre-Incas are often still used today.

The eastern Andes are heavily forested up to 3,350m and sweep down into the Amazon Basin.

Peru’s selva or jungle makes up almost two thirds of the country’s area, but holds only about 6% of the population: the only towns with significant populations are Iquitos and Pucallpa.

 

Weather in Amazon of Peru

The Amazon rainforest

Year-round, weather conditions are hot and humid and there is always the risk of rain

There is a ‘dry season’ in Tambopata and Manu between May and October. The average daytime high temperature is between 25°C and 34°C and the average nighttime low is between 16°C and 22°C. Heavy downpours typically occur every few days.

Around 80% of annual average rainfall – approx 2,000 mm in Manu and Tambopata and 1,400 mm in Iquitos – occurs in the wet season Nov-April.

On rare occasions, between May and September, cold fronts from Argentina – ‘friajes’ – can sweep into southwest Amazonia and push temperatures down to 9° C. (Friajes usually last between 1 and 3 days).

Vaccinations for Peru

We strongly suggest that everyone planning to travel to Peru visits their local doctor/travel clinic prior to departure for the latest vaccination information.

 

Recommended vaccinations

  • Up-to-date diphtheria and polio.
  • Tetanus or tetanus booster. (These three are effective for ten years.)
  • ‘Havrix’ for Hepatitis A. The course of two injections protects you for ten years. Gamma globulin is cheaper butless effective.
  • Typhoid vaccine is recommended by some doctors although it will not provide total protection and being careful about what you eat and drink is your best defence. It is given in two shots, four weeks apart and lasts for three years. Unless at exceptional risk, people over the age of 35 who have received four or more courses of typhoid immunisation need no more.
  • A pre-exposure rabies vaccination is worth considering if you are going to be in contact with animals or morethan 24 hours away from a reliable source of vaccine. Hikers are at some risk from rural dogs, certain of which carry rabies, and those visiting coastal or rainforest areas could be exposed to rabid bats.
  • Yellow fever. Not effective until ten days after inoculation; not recommended for pregnant women. This is also effective for ten years.

For people travelling to the Amazon/coast below 1,500m north of Lima and regions below 1,500m:

  • Anti-malarial protection (not needed for higher altitude). Peru has chloroquine-resistant strains of malaria and it is important that you follow the prophylactic regime carefully. In the UK, contact the Malaria Reference Laborator. North Americans should contact the Centers for Disease Control.
  • Zika. Spread by mosquito bikes and also a risk of sexual transmission. People planning pregnancies / pregnant women are advised against all travel to areas reporting Zika. If you develop any feverish illness whilst travelling or on return medical attention must be sought quickly.
  • Dengue Fever. There is no vaccine and prevention is through avoidance of mosquito bites. The mosquito that spreads dengue bites during the day and is more common in urban areas. Symptoms include fever, headache, severe joint, bone and muscular pain – hence its other name ‘breakbone fever’.

Kit list

Good kit is vital for every trip.

Book with Andean Trails and get 15% off Páramo’s fantastic ethical and high performance outdoor gear.

You can also read our blog about a day in the Amazon rainforest of Peru.

 

Detailed kit list

  • The original and a photocopy of your passport.
  • Yellow fever inoculation certificate.
  • Good binoculars.
  • Tight-weave, light weight long trousers.
  • Quick dry socks.
  • Rain suit or long poncho (100% waterproof – test before you leave home).
  • Long-sleeved tight-weave shirts.
  • T-shirts.
  • A bottle or canteen to carry water on outings (1-2 litres).
  • Sunscreen (factor 30+) and lip salve.
  • A broad-brimmed hat that will not come off on windy boat-rides.
  • 1-2 pairs of shorts.
  • Sunglasses with UV filter.
  • A pair of trainers.
  • Ankle high, hiking boots.
  • Insect repellent.
  • Towel & wash-kit.
  • Wet Wipes/antiseptic hand-wash cream.
  • Head-lamp (plus spare bulb and batteries).
  • Personal first-aid kit to include: painkillers, plasters (band-aids), moleskin, anti-biotic cream, general antibiotics (ask your GP), after-bite (tiger balm), anti-diarrhoea tablets, throat lozenges, re-hydration salts & personal medication.
  • Cash (small denomination bills) for souvenirs at the lodge, alcoholic beverages, etc.
  • A small day pack, 30 litres.
  • Camera and film / memory cards (take at least twice the amount you think you will need!).
  • Book, e-book, mp3 player/ipod or other to help pass the time.
  • Spanish/English phrasebook.
  • Extra snacks i.e. cereal bars or favourite chocolate bars.

 

Please note: Guests should arrive in clothes which they do not mind getting slightly dirty or wet, and should wear footwear that is suitable to walk on a rainforest trail. Sun cream, insect repellent, hat and waterproof clothing should be carried in hand luggage and kept accessible for the journey to the lodge.

You may want to keep your binoculars and camera handy, too.

All bedding, toilet paper etc. is provided at the lodge (or camp, if camping).

Quick facts about Peru

 

Official name: Republic of Peru

Country population: 27,083,000

Capital city: Lima (8.1 million)

Largest cities: Lima, Arequipa, Trujillo, Chiclayo

Languages: Spanish (official), Quechua (official), Aymará

Latitude/Longitude: 10º S, 76º W

Official currency: New Sol

Major industries: copper, gold, zinc, textiles, chemicals, pharmaceuticals

Time zone: GMT-5

Peru Festivals

February 

Festival: Carnaval 

Games throwing water, flour as well as dance and music.   

Location: Highlands and some coastal areas.  

 

Festival: Fiesta de La Candelaria 

Culture, music and dancing 

Location: Puno 

 

March  

Festival: Fiesta de La Vendimia      

Wine harvest festival 

Location: Ica  

 

24 June 

Festival: Inti Raymi 

Culture, music and dancing 

Location: Cusco   

 

28/29 July 

Festival: Independencia 

Independence day – celebration of Peruvian culture – various activities 

Location: Country wide 

Flights

Andean Trails can book all your international and domestic flights for this trip and for UK passengers, we have full ATOL bonding and can book flights with most airlines.

International flight prices are variable and usually can only be guaranteed at the time of booking. If you would like to upgrade to business or first class, or even arrive at an earlier date/depart at a later date we can also arrange this for you.

International flights will arrive into Lima. If you arrive in the afternoon, you will most likely need to overnight in Lima before travelling onwards. If you arrive into Lima in the morning, it is possible to make connections to Cusco, Arequipa, Lake Titicaca etc, on the same day. You need to acclimatise in Cusco or a similar altitude (Puno for example) before you start the Inca Trail. Ideally, this will be for three nights, immediately prior to the trek start date.

Please contact us for flight and acclimatisation advice especially if you do make a connection on the same day. It is important to purchase a through ticket and not separate tickets for connections, so that you are covered for any delays. Passengers with separate tickets who are delayed run the risk of having to buy an entirely new ticket to continue their journeys.

Please note all airline schedules are subject to change and are out of our control.

ATOL holiday protection

Andean Trails has two decades of experience of dealing with South America holidays.

We pay a fee to the CAA for every licensable passenger we book since we hold an Air Travel Organiser’s Licence granted by the Civil Aviation Authority. In the unlikely event of our insolvency, the CAA will ensure that you are not stranded abroad and will arrange to refund any money you have paid to us for an advance booking.

We also offer ATOL (Civil Aviation Authority) protected holidays to give our customers peace of mind when booking and travelling.

When you buy an ATOL protected air holiday package from Andean Trails Ltd you will receive a Confirmation Invoice from us confirming your arrangements and your protection under our Air Travel Organiser’s Licence number 6275.

You can read more about ATOL, who is covered and what protections you have if not ATOL-covered, on our ATOL page.

 

What is ATOL?

The CAA’s ATOL scheme offers protection to your money and your holiday if you book with us. Not everybody is covered (see ‘Who is covered?’ for more), as you must purchase an ‘air package holiday’ with Andean Trails to be protected.

And  ‘air package holiday’ is defined as including a flight and some ground services (hotel, transfer, trek etc). This is also known as an ‘ATOL-protected holiday’.

 

Who is covered?

To be covered by ATOL, you must book a flight and some ground services with us and be from the UK. If you are from the UK and only book ground services and no flights, you are not covered by ATOL (see below for more on how non-ATOL clients are covered).

If you are outside the UK and buy flights with us, you will be ATOL protected IF any of the flights booked with Andean Trails touches/stops in the UK at any point during your holiday package booked with us.

If you buy your flights elsewhere, please check with that agent if you are ATOL protected. Be careful with online flight purchases and make sure you know what protection you have, if any, before paying for flights.

Not all holiday or travel services offered and sold by us will be protected by the ATOL scheme. Please ask us to confirm what protection may apply to your booking.

For land only holidays not involving any air travel, in accordance with “The Package Travel, Package Holidays and Package Tours Regulations 1992”, all UK passengers booking with Andean Trails Ltd. are fully protected for the initial deposit and subsequently the balance of all money paid to us, arising from cancellation or curtailment of travel arrangements due to the insolvency of Andean Trails.

 

I’m not ATOL covered, what protection do I have?

If you are not ATOL covered, any payments you make to us go to a Trust account.

We can only access this money once your tour has been completed, meaning that if anything happens to Andean Trails Limited while you are on holiday, then your money is secure and you can either complete the trip or be able to make it home.

If you pay for your holiday with a credit card, some offer payment protection – please check with your cardholder.

You also should have cancellation protection written into your insurance (which we recommend you have at the time of booking) in case you need to cancel.

Be safe in Peru

The Lima suburb of Miraflores is a good base for easing yourself into Peruvian culture.

Although a fairly safe district, we strongly recommend taking these precautions in Lima and also throughout the country:

  • Leave paper valuables in hotel safe (caja fuerte), taking only what you need for the day. Carry a copy of passport (leave original in safe). When travelling, carry paper valuables in a money belt under clothing, not in a ‘bum-bag’.
  • In Miraflores (Lima), be suspicious of ‘overly-friendly’ locals or ‘tourists’ who might be con-men/women. Also, avoid the beach areas off-season. During the Dec-April beach season, beware bag-snatchers on the beach.
  • We suggest you do not exchange money on the street. Use either a casa de cambio (bureau de change) or bank, ATM machine.
  • More care is needed in downtown Lima. Only take a daypack if you’re in a group. We suggest you carry this on your chest. Carry camera in bag, replacing after use. If alone, you’re advised to avoid downtown Lima at night.
  • In Lima, as elsewhere in Peru, always take special care in markets and busy streets. Great care is needed in the markets and bus offices of central Lima, the San Camilo market in Arequipa and Cusco’s San Pedro market. Never carry a bag or valuables in these areas, as bag-slashers, watch snatchers and pickpockets operate. Beware of distraction techniques.
  • At night, avoid quiet streets or streets with poor lighting, especially if alone; it’s best to use taxis at night, wherever you are.
  • NEVER leave your bags unattended, especially in airports, bus terminals and hotel lobbies.

Food and drink in Peru

Read some of our blogs about food and drink in Peru:

 

Starters

Palta rellena Avocado filled with chicken salad.
Palta reina Avocado filled with mixed salad and mayonnaise.
 Papa a la huancaina  Cold potatoes with a rich egg-and-cheese sauce.
 Rocoto relleno  Stuffed green peppers (often very hot).
 Tamales or humitas  Ground maize steamed in banana leaves, filled with meat or cheese; sometimes they are sweet.
 Sopa criolla  A creamy spiced soup with noodles and a little chopped meat.
Chupe de mariscos A very rich and creamy shellfish soup.
 Causa  A cold dish made from mashed yellow potatoes, avocado & peppers.

      

 

Main dishes (meat)    

Churrasco and Lomo            Fillet or rump steak.

Apanado                                Breaded meat cutlet.

Chorrillana                           Meat smothered in tomato & onion sauce.

Adobo (Cusco speciality)      Chopped, marinated pork in a richly seasoned gravy.

Piqueo                                    A very spicy stew with meat, onions and potatoes.

Sancochado                           Lots of meat, vegetables and garlic.

Lomo saltado                        Chopped meat in a sauce containing onions, tomatoes and potatoes.

Picante de …                        Meat or fish with a hot, spicy sauce.

Parrillada                             Grilled beef, sausage and offal.

Chicharrones                        Chunks of pork, deep-fried with roast potatoes and corn.

Chaufa                                  Chinese-style fried rice.

Cabro or Cabrito                  Goat meat.

Antichuchos                          Beef-heart shish kebab.

Pollo a la brasa con papas           The ubiquitous spit-roast chicken and chips.

Pachamanca                         Typical highlands festival/Sunday treat. Meats and vegetables cooked underground on hot stones.

 

Fish dishes (mainly coast)  

Chorros a la chalaca                    Mussels with tomato and onion sauce (cold starter).

Conchas a la Parmesana             Scallops with melted parmesan (hot starter).

Ceviche de pescado/mariscos      Marinated fish/shellfish.

Tiradito de pescado/mariscos      Marinated fish/shellfish in hot sauce.

Corvina/Lenguado                        Sea bass/Sole.

Chicharron de Pulpo/Calamares          Deep-fried Octopus/Squid.

Jalea                                              Dish of deep fried fish & shellfish.

Sudado de pescado                        Steamed fish.

 

Fish dishes (mainly highlands)

Pejerrey a la plancha             Grilled fresh-water king fish.

Trucha frita                             Fried trout.

Chupe de Camarron                Rich soup of fresh-water shrimp.

 

Desserts     

Mazamorra morada        Pudding made from purple maize and fruit.

Flan                                 Crème caramel.

Picarones                         Delicious rings of fried batter served with syrup.

Keke or torta                    Cake.

 

Drinks  

Pisco                                 Grape brandy. Very popular as Pisco Sour cocktail, with lemon, sugar and egg-white.

Chicha de jora                 Fermented maize beer. Integral to many rural celebrations. In Andean villages, look out for houses with bright plastic ‘flower’ tied to a pole above door: this indicates that the householder sells chicha.

Chicha morada                A soft drink made from purple maize.

Cerveza                             Lager-type beer which is very popular. There are several regional brands such as Cusqueña and Arequipeña.

Vino                                   Many local Peruvian wines are very sweet by gringo standards. Tacama and Ocucaje are the best ‘export-quality’ Peruvian wine brands. Good Chilean wines available locally include Undurraga and Casillero del Diablo. Wine is available in smarter restaurants and is served by the bottle (botella) and sometimes by the glass (copa).

Vino tinto                         Red wine.

Vino blanco                     White wine.

Agua mineral                   Mineral water. You need to specify con gas (carbonated) or sin gas (non-carbonated).

Mate                                 Herbal tea. The best known is mate de coca , which is often served to tourists on arrival in Cusco, Huaraz or Puno to ward off symptoms of altitude sickness. Many other herbal teas such as manzanilla (camomile), hierba luisa (lemon grass), hierba buena (mint) and anis (aniseed) are available. Mate is usually served after lunch.

Jugos                                Fruit juices.

Money matters

Currency & Money Exchange

Peru’s monetary unit is the “Nuevo Sol” (S/.)

Most of your transactions will be in Soles, but US dollars are often accepted, too, if they are small denomination, unmarked and undamaged bills. Try to take 5s, 10s and 20s.

ATM debit/credit cards are now widely used in major restaurants, hotels and shops (with fees), and there are ATM (‘hole-in-the-wall’) machines widely available in towns and cities.

When changing money, don’t change with street changers (cambistas). Use a bank or casa de cambio (bureau de change). Ask for ‘billetes chicos’ (small notes, i.e. 10 or 20 sol notes) as obtaining change outside towns and cities can be difficult. Count your soles carefully before handing over your US dollars, and look out for forged notes.

Exchange rate: USD 1 = 3.2 Peruvian Soles (approx.), June 2018.

 

Eating and drinking

Peru has a great culinary tradition.

There are more and more top-end restaurants opening in Lima and Cusco, where you can easily spend more than USD 100pp on food and wine.

Prices vary greatly, below is a rough guide to what you can expect to pay in Peru.

Don’t forget to read out tipping guide to Peru.

 

Local café/restaurant

Beer/soft drink: USD 2

Menu del dia: USD 3-5

Coffee: USD 1

 

Tourist style restaurant

Beer/soft drink: USD 2-3

Main dish: USD 10 upwards

Coffee: USD 2

Tipping

Tipping is entirely voluntary and how much you give depends on how you feel about the service you have received.

For background, Peru has a minimum salary of 550 Nuevo Soles (US$170) monthly for a 6 day 48 hour week. However in many of the lower paid jobs (eg waiters, porters etc) this is not always enforced.

This is a rough guideline, based on an approx. rate of USD 1 = Peruvian Soles 3.

  • Airport porters: Minimum 2-5 Soles per bag – compulsory.
  • Hotel staff: 2-3 Soles per bag / per breakfast.
  • Transfer drivers: Generally not expected.
  • Drivers: 10-60 Soles per day total from the group.
  • Specialist guides (incl. Inca Trail guides): US$20-60 per day total from the group.
  • Assistant guides: US$10-30 per day total from the group
  • Group Inca trail support staff: 100-300 Soles per client, pooled and divided
  • Other treks support staff: 25-50 Soles per client per day, pooled and divided
  • Tour leaders: US$10-60 per day total from the group.
  • Restaurants: 5-15% for adequate to excellent food and service

 

Inca Trail (if applicable)

If you are hiking the Inca Trail, you will be supported by a full crew of cooks, porters, waiters etc, and it is a little more complicated to organise in terms of tipping.

We recommend that each client contributes 100-300soles (30-90US) into a pot and following the advice of the guide divide it out between the crew of cooks, waiters and porters.

For tipping the actual Inca Trail guides and assistants we recommend following the advice for specialist guides above.

Plugs and voltages

Electricity

220 volts (110v in some hotels), 60 Hz.

Most cameras, phones and computers are dual or multi voltage and probably won’t need a convertor – please check before leaving.

Some items you may bring, such as hairdryers, may need a convertor. They may short if you use them without the correct convertor.

A surge protector is recommended.

 

Plugs

Peru has sockets that, in general, take the two pin, round-prong Type C plugs. Some will also take flat-pronged, Type A plugs.

Type C plug

Type C plug

Type A plug

Type A plug

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communication

Dialling codes

The international code for Peru is +51.

Regions have dialling codes, with a 0 prefix.

 

Landlines

Peru’s landlines have 6-7 digits, and to call landline-landline in the same city, simply dial the 7 digits.

If calling landline to another regional landline/city, start with a 0 then the regional code.

If using your own mobile phone to call a landline, dial the country code, the regional/city code without the 0, and then the number, e.g. for Lima (code: 01), dial +51 1 1234567.

 

Mobiles

Mobile phones start with a number 9, and are 9 digits in length.

If you are dialling a Peruvian landline/mobile to a Peru mobile, simply dial the full 9-digit number from anywhere in Peru.

If using your own mobile phone to call a Peruvian mobile, dial the country code, then the 9-digit mobile number: e.g. +51 999 999 999.

Almost all unlocked phones will work in Peru with a local SIM, however – check with your provider before arrival if your phone will work.

Roaming charges may be high – again, best to check.

 

Internet

Most hotels, cafes, restaurants and airports offer free and generally good Wi-Fi.

There are plenty of locoturios – internet cafes – offering cheap and good internet in most towns and cities.

 

Post

Head to the privatised postal service, Serpost.

Useful Spanish phrases

Learning a few words of Spanish can really ingratiate you with the locals you’ll encounter, adding to the enjoyment of your holiday.

Below are some basics to get you started.

 

Greetings:

Good morning                                         Buenos días

How are you?                                         ¿Cómo estás?

Good afternoon                                      Buenas tardes

Good bye                                               Adiós

 

Most frequently asked questions (theirs):

Where are you (plural) from?                   ¿De dónde eres (son)?

What time is it?                                           ¿Qué hora es?

Where have you come from?                    ¿De dónde vienes?

Give me (frequent, unwelcome question)    Dáme / regálame

 

Most frequent questions (yours):

How much is it?                                      ¿Cuánto vale?

What is this place called?                       ¿Cómo se llama este lugar?

What’s your name?                                 ¿Cómo te llamas?

Do you have a map?                                ¿Tienes un mapa?

 

In the street / places:

Where can I find a currency exchange?    ¿Dónde encuentro una casa de cambio?

Where is there a cash machine?                ¿Dónde hay un cajero automatico?

Where is the underground/subway station? ¿Dónde esta la estacion de metro/subte(Buenos Aires)?

Where can I find a taxi?                             ¿Dónde puedo encontrar un taxi?

Where can I find a Supermarket?            ¿Dónde puedo encontrar un supermercado?

Where is the hospital?                               ¿Dónde esta el hospital?

Where can I find a restaurant?               ¿Dónde puedo encontrar un restaurante?

 

In the hotel:

What floor am I on?                                   ¿En qué piso estoy?

Where are the elevators/lifts?                 ¿Dónde están los ascensores?

How do I access the Internet?                 ¿Cómo puedo acceder a Internet?

How do I call for room service?                ¿Cómo llamo para el servicio de habitación?

How do I call down to the front desk?      ¿Cómo llamo a la recepción?

 

In the restaurant:

A table for two/four please                     Una mesa para dos/cuatro, porfavor

I would like to drink…                             Me gustaria tomar….

May I see a menu?                                   Puedo ver la carta/menu?

I would like to order..                              Me gustaria pedir…

Can you bring me the check/bill please.     Me trae la cuenta por favor

 

Emergency:

I need help.                                              Necesito ayuda.

I have lost my passport.                        He perdido mi pasaporte.

Someone stole my money.                    Alguien robó mi dinero

I have been robbed.                                Me han robado

I need to call the police.                         Necesito llamar a la policía

I need to call the (country) Embassy     Necesito llamar a la embajada de (country)

Help!                                                           ¡Socorro!

 

Responsible Travel - our ethos

Andean Trails believes in Responsible Travel and actively supports several community projects.

Please see Our Advice and Our Ethos for more, and learn about the Projects We Support.

We operate the Inca Trail, our treks and tours with local firms.

We make sure that on our tours and Inca Trail we employ local staff, who are paid fair wages.

With the Inca Trail, We provide free life insurance to all of our porters. Tented accommodation and meals are provided for all trekking staff as well as foam mats, sleeping bags and rain ponchos. We have also provided the staff with trekking shoes. We ensure our porters carry a maximum of only 20kg. We offer them backpacks and they generally use back supports.

Clean burning fuel is used to cook the meals on the Inca Trail and porters carry gas stoves and butane bottles. We use biodegradable detergents when washing the cooking and eating utensils. If any part of our tour or trek is operated by another company, we try to ensure that high standards are maintained.

Our additional support helps the Huchuy Yachaq project which supports children and families in one of the poorest communities in the district of Cusco.

Responsible Travel - travel tips

Responsible Tourism – Code of Conduct:

  • Find out about your destination – take some time before you go to read about the cultural, social and political background of the place and people you are visiting.
  • Go equipped with basic words and phrases in the local language – this may open up opportunities for you to meet people who live there.
  • Buy locally-made goods and use locally-provided services wherever possible – your support is often vital to local people.
  • Pay a fair price for the goods or services you buy – if you haggle for the lowest price your bargain may be at someone else’s expense.
  • Be sensitive to the local culture – dress and act in a way that respects local beliefs and customs, particularly at religious sites.
  • Don’t undermine the local economic systems – we recommend you don’t give gifts, especially sweets as there are few dentists in the Andes. Much better to spend time chatting, playing and showing postcards of home. If you would like to donate clothes and shoes etc we are more than happy to do so through the relevant channels. Your tour leader can do this for you and some of the projects we support can be visited.
  • Ask permission before taking photographs of individuals or of people’s homes – and remember that you may be expected to pay for the privilege.
  • Avoid conspicuous displays of wealth – this can accentuate the gap between rich and poor and distance you from the cultures you came to experience.
  • Make no promises to local people that you can’t keep – be realistic about what you will do when you return home.
  • Minimise your environmental impact – keep to footpaths and marked routes, don’t remove any of the natural habitat and reduce the packaging you bring.
  • Don’t pollute local water courses- use biodegradable products, and wash basins.
  • Slow down and enjoy the differences – you’ll be back with the familiar soon enough.

Our environmental policy

All our activities are governed by our respect for the environment and the people who live in it. We aim to make a positive impact both in the UK and in the Andean countries we work in (Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina).

We agree with the principals of sustainable development and specifically promote environmentally aware tourism in the Andean countries, in order to preserve the heritage of the people who live there and to help protect their environment.

In the UK we use recycled paper where possible, recycle what we can and attempt to keep waste to an absolute minimum.

Throughout South America we work together with local people, paying them a fair price, and putting money into the local economy. We do this by using local agents, local trek staff and experienced and qualified local mountain and cultural guides who have an in-depth knowledge of their own country. Our porters on the Inca Trail are fairly paid, carry a maximum load of 20kg and are supplied with tents and food. In other areas we use donkeys or horses to carry loads.

We use locally owned services such as hotels and restaurants, wherever possible. We buy fresh local produce for all of our treks from markets in each departure town. We use public transport whenever possible and feasible.

We have ongoing contact with the teams that we work with and also with local families in the areas we trek through, developing relationships with them and donating goods such as clothes and shoes to their communities, through appropriate local agencies. We also support local Peruvian charities, specifically NIÑOS in Cusco, and CARE in the Huaraz area, plus Huchuy Yachaq.

If you have any suitable (warm) clothes and shoes that you would like to donate to Peruvian children please take them with you and give them to your tour leader, who will ensure they go to a suitable organization.

When out on tour we encourage learning about the countries we travel in, the local culture of the teams we work with and the areas we pass through. Our guides hold informal talks with groups to inform about and discuss with them all aspects of local life. This helps understanding of the area and appreciation of the people who live there.

Our group sizes are kept to a maximum of 16 people, and we encourage smaller groups where possible. This minimises the negative impact we make on the local people, the wildlife and the environment, and increases the quality time spent in contact with the local people and environment.

When trekking we adhere to a responsible tourism code of practice and are also involved in ongoing training of our trek staff.

Health and Safety

A full Health and Safety document will be sent to you at the time of booking and before you travel.

You can also read it on our website, or contact us for more information.

Travel Insurance

It is a condition of booking any of our holidays that you have comprehensive travel insurance to cover you for trip cancellation (by you), activities involved and destination. This cover should include repatriation costs, air ambulance and helicopter rescue.

We work with Travel Nomads, who offer insurance solutions to people in more than 140 countries across the world.

Should you decide not to purchase this insurance, you must provide us with details of your alternative insurance with or before your final payment.

And lastly...

Many of our tours travel through remote areas.

We believe our clients should be aware that the remoteness of some of our tours so very special could also cause certain problems.

Thus, whilst we endeavour to minimise the chances of anything unexpected happening, it has to be noted that no itinerary can or should be rigidly adhered to.

This is the very nature of adventure travel and we expect our clients to be prepared for delays and slight alterations in our programmed events.

Also, shared tours may include travellers from all over the world whose native language is not English.

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